Little Nane Has Big Things to Say

Little Nane Has Big Things to Say

I love good quality music. And I love it even more if it’s produced in Armenia. I think there’s potential to put Armenia on the music map with all the talent we have available. So what else to do but support them? That’s basically how it all began. Ayo! had a meeting with the rock band Dogma because we wanted to find some ways to work together pretty much because we just love their music. And we’re not the only ones.
We were after a partnership with the band and for something big or small, be it a joint project, an activity or a concert. During our discussions the band’s producer Vartan mentioned that Dogma had been working on and off for about a year on a song called Nane.
I am neither a songwriter nor a musician but as someone who works with visual imagery I know that if I try something once, twice or even three times and I still don’t like what I see, I have to give it up because it’s not going to flow, it’s not organic, so basically it’s not meant to be. When I realize that I can’t achieve the result I had initially envisioned I need to completely change the concept and the approach. So what Vartan said seemed a bit strange to me at first but when I found out the song was related to the genocide it all started to come together in my head. This topic, which is so embedded in our collective consciousness on one hand but yet still so emotionally powerful, causes artists to interpret it in different ways.
“Just yesterday Heno [the guitarist] played a couple of tunes during the rehearsal,” Vartan added before he was suddenly interrupted by Zara, the vocalist, who arrived a bit late to the meeting.
All these sneak peeks into Nane’s “life” intrigued me greatly. I asked if I could listen to some of the song. While they told me they only had the initial chords down my curiosity wouldn’t leave me alone. I needed to hear them.
As soon as the tune started playing, I was mesmerized. The music was calm and tense at the same time; it was melodic and powerful. Then all of a sudden Zara started to sing along and I felt a rush of emotion. It didn’t take me more than a minute to realize that I wanted to create a video for this song.
Fast forward four weeks.
I am making the last changes on my video sequence, preparing the final version, and I catch myself on the thought that I have been listening to this song so consistently for almost one month, dozens of times a day even so that by this point I must have heard it more than Dogma itself. Surprisingly, I realized that I liked it just as much as the first time I heard it and was immediately captivated.
Truly, it was an unforgettable journey I’ve had with Nane and I wouldn’t hesitate a second if I were asked to take that journey again.